Electric Review

Culture & Criticism From the Far Distant Realms

New From Rock Icons, Macmillan Audio & Tor

KEITH RICHARDS: A LIFE IN PICTURES. Various photographers. Andy Neill, Editor. The Overlook Press.

Life In Pictures

Image courtesy of Overlook Press.

This just-released study captures the enigmatic rock-blues guitarist in stunning fashion, with pictures snapped by an assortment of hall-of-fame photographers illuminating every layer of Keith Richards. The book is comprised of over 300 snaps in black and white by the likes of Jim Marshall, Terry O’Neill, Deborah Feingold, Neil Preston and Mark Seliger. The centerpiece of the volume is found in the pictures that Annie Leibovitz took of Richards during a 2008 advertising shoot for Louis Vuitton – pictures that brilliantly record the buried sensibilities of rock’s original bad boy. Also notable are the shots taken by Jim Marshall, who brings the shadowy soul of Richards to life with subtlety and softness.

Also From Overlook Press

Stevie Nicks: Visions, Dreams and Rumors. Zoe Howe. The Overlook Press.

Visions Dreams & Rumours

Image courtesy of Overlook Press.

Howe’s biography artfully tells the story of the voice that became the heart and soul of Fleetwood Mac. Some of the best moments of the book are found in the tidbits about Nick’s childhood which paint an effective portrait of the artist on stage.

THE THINGS WE KEEP. Audio Book. Sally Hepworth. Macmillan Audio.

The Things We Keep tells the story of Anna Foster, a young woman inexplicably beset with Alzheimer’s disease. Her family, unable to manage the situation at home, bring Anna to an assisted living center. There, an unexpected miracle happens: Even though there is only one other person at the Rosalind House her age, the two come to fall in love. But it is not a simple care-free love, and many challenges follow. Hepworth’s story is smartly conceived and it will ring relevant to anyone graduating into the final phase of life. Ultimately, each and every reader will surely place themselves in Anna’s chair, coming to wonder how they’d do if their mind suddenly started to fade from grasp. Read by Therese Plummer and Barrie Kreinik. 10 hours on 8 CDS.

BARSK: THE ELEPHANTS’ GRAVEYARD. Lawrence Schoen. Tor.

Barsk

Image courtesy of Tor.

To say this book is original and riveting would be the understatement of the year. In Schoen’s land of “Barsk,” the terrain is alive with half-human creatures who proceed on a singular mission – that being: to teach readers that ‘the life well-lived’ isn’t about money or material objects, but instead, about the effect you had on the other beings you encountered on your personal journey through time.

by John Aiello

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This entry was posted on February 3, 2016 by in 2016, February 2016, In the Spotlight, Rat On Fiction & Nonfiction, Rat On Music and tagged , , , , .
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