Electric Review

Culture & Criticism From the Far Distant Realms

Spotlighting Chicago Poet Nancy Botta

In celebration of National Poetry Month 2019, The Electric Review introduces Chicago-area poet Nancy Botta. As readers know, the ER rarely publishes original work. For me to publish someone, their work must be exceptional both in tone, style and originality. In turn, a single tour through Botta’s work evinces why she appears here now: A young master of Haiku, Botta’s imagery stabs and presses, embedding itself in the heart, haunting the buried layers of the consciousness with its raw honesty. Alas, there seems no better forum than National Poetry 2019 to let her work speak for itself.

Three Haiku

Downpour

Wet season arrives

with muddy hems and soft groans—

black umbrellas bloom.

Mire

Drifting morning fog;

rivulets gather and wash

over broken trees.

Luna

A cool milky moon

spills through an open doorway—

she drinks in silence.

Original watercolor by Eric Ward, © 2019. All rights reserved.

Rosemary

I used to like roses,

and a stiff drink-

maybe?

I can’t recall now,

it makes the scar itch.

 

They said I argued too much,

“quarrelsome and prone to hysterics”-

footnotes to an epithet (or is it epitaph?)

 

Sometimes my skull aches,

and sometimes I forgetthereisaspacebetween

my

self,

like a pocket of air

beneath the skin.

 

(helpless blood pooling

into a nice white space)

 

I don’t know why

I’d bang and scream,

why I’d claw at my arms

and let things vex me so much,

claw at their eyes

and let them vex me so much.

 

Troublesome;

but they had a cure,

a treatment for tempests

drinking from tea cups-

 

I told them

I told them

I don’t like the blankness

filling up my mind—

 

did you know

I used to like roses

and a stiff drink?

by Nancy Botta

© Nancy Botta. All rights reserved.


Nancy Botta lives in a Chicago suburb with her husband, son, and a menagerie of tropical fish. A marketing concierge for a multinational conglomerate, Nancy has been publishing poetry in digital forums online since the halcyon days of LiveJournal and AOL 4.0. Her most recent works have appeared in WINK: Writers in the Know; Soft Cartel; Three Lines Poetry; Furtive Dalliance; Haiku Journal; and other publications. Find her, and the remainder of her poetry, at https://rustedhoney.com/.

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One comment on “Spotlighting Chicago Poet Nancy Botta

  1. Nancy Botta
    April 1, 2019

    Reblogged this on Rusted Honey and commented:
    Thanks to John Aiello for featuring me on his blog, The Electric Review.

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This entry was posted on April 1, 2019 by in 2019, April 2019, Features & Profiles and tagged .
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