Electric Review

Culture & Criticism From the Far Distant Realms

In Homage To the Father of the Modern Rock Song

BOB DYLAN: THE 30TH ANNIVERSARY CONCERT CELEBRATION. Bob Dylan & Various artists. CD & DVD: Deluxe Edition includes the first-time release of this material on DVD and Blue-ray Disc. First CD and VHS versions originally released 1993. Columbia Records/Legacy.

Bob Dylan

Image courtesy Columbia/Legacy.

Bob Dylan’s influence on American song-writing is unsurpassed, as evinced by Bob Dylan – The 30th Anniversary Concert Celebration. Recorded on October 16, 1992 at Madison Square Garden In New York to commemorate the 30th anniversary of Dylan’s first Columbia album, this serves as a hallmark recording representative of Dylan’s body of work and the position he holds among his peers, so many of whom were influenced by this vast songbook that broke all the conventional rules, taking no prisoners. The 30th Anniversary Concert features the voices of many of Dylan’s contemporaries who came together to pay tribute to the father of the modern rock-song – honoring him via the performance of his compositions. The result is a one-of-a kind “who’s who” album that spotlights compelling interpretations of Dylan’s best-known pieces, as well as random, seldom-heard gems. Stand-out cuts include “It Ain’t Me Babe” (June Carter Cash and Johnny Cash); “Foot Of Pride” (Lou Reed); “Seven Days” (Ron Wood); “When The Ship Comes In” (Clancy Brothers); “Absolutely Sweet Marie” (George Harrison); “Emotionally Yours” (O’Jays). What is most astounding about hearing The 30th Anniversary Concert comes via the realization of how many great songs Bob Dylan has written: even lesser-known tunes like “You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere” (Mary Chapin Carpenter/Rosanne Cash/Shawn Colvin) demonstrate Dylan’s uncanny ability to rhyme the silent spaces between now and breath and create lasting shades of music. In terms of rock and roll, Bob Dylan is the jewel-speckled crown of the genre. If you want incontrovertible proof of this fact, then pick up a copy of The 30th Anniversary Concert; in turn, you will bear witness to today’s legends paying their respects to the guy who paved the path for them.

Additional points of interest:

DVD Bonus Tracks:

  • “Leopard-Skin Pill-box Hat,” John Mellencamp
  • “Boots Of Spanish Leather,” Nancy Griffith with Carolyn Hester
  • “Gotta Serve Somebody,” Booker T. & The M.G.’s

DVD Bonus Features:

  • “Behind The Scenes” 40 minutes of previously unreleased rehearsal footage & interviews.

CD Audio Bonus Tracks:

  • Sinéad O’Connor, “I Believe In You” (from sound check; previously unreleased)
  • Eric Clapton, “Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright” (from sound check; previously unreleased)
See bobdylan.com for complete details.

by John Aiello

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This entry was posted on March 20, 2014 by in 2014, In the Spotlight, March 2014, Rat On Music and tagged , , .
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